jedburgh To Lindisfarne

Tweed to Tyne

Route length: 50 miles

A church or sacred site

Destination hub

Linton Kirk

Standing on a sandy knoll, a 12th-century church much altered later and restored in 1912 by P MacGregor Chalmers.  Linton Kirk is most noted for the stone above the porch said to depict a knight on horseback lancing two creatures. The stone is Norman and unique in Scotland, and legend suggests that this is the first known Somerville killing a worm.


This site is featured in Scotland’s Churches Trust guide book Borders & East Lothian, reference number .

You can see more details on the SCT website.

The Scottish Episcopal Church of St John the Evangelist, Jedburgh

The Kirk of Yetholm, Kirk Yetholm

Morebattle Parish Church

Crailing Parish Church

By Road

Leave Jedburgh going eastwards for Crailinghall. Then by way of Cessford and on to the B6401 to Morebattle. Continue on this road to Yetholm, turning right there to take the road through Kirk Yetholm and past Yetholm Mains. Turn right on the B6352. Turn right for Kilham on the B6351 going through Kirknewton and past the monument at Old Yeavering. Join the A697 in to Wooler. Leave Wooler on the B6348, turning left when you reach the B6349. At the crossroads at West Lyham turn left on to the minor road which leads to the car park at Holburn Green and the walk to St Cuthbert's Cave. Then continue north until turning left to cross the A1 at West Mains and approach the causeway to Lindisfarne. Remember that you cannot cross the causeway for some time either side of high tide. To check when you can cross, go to http://www.lindisfarne.org.uk/general/travel.htm

Tide times are subject to vast variations throughout each month and in particular during strong winds. Tide tables can only be advisory. Ensure that you observe the warning signs particularly along the road side. The tidal currents can be very strong. Should you become stranded use the refuge boxes provided.

By Cycle

Leave Jedburgh going eastwards for Crailinghall. In Cessford turn right to cross the Cessford Burn, and then left. You will now be on The St Cuthbert's Way as far as Morebattle. Keep left in Morebattle, heading for Primsidehill and Yetholm. Turn right in Yetholm for Kirk Yetholm and Yetholm Mains. At Yetholm Mains go straight ahead to follow the minor road on the south side of Bowmont Water. You will join the B6351 at Kilham. Continue through Kirknewton and past the monument at old Yeavering. Join the A697 at Akeld. Branch right as you pass Humbleton Buildings to enter Wooler on a minor road.

Leave Wooler on NCN 68. Follow this route as far as Weetwood Hall where you turn right, following The St Cuthbert's Way. Stay on this Way until reaching the left turn which takes you past Hazelrigg Mill. Take this road, turning right for Holburn Grange in order to reach St Cuthbert's Cave. From there you may like to walk the half mile on up the hill to look seawards. Then continue north until turning left to cross the A1 at West Mains and approach the causeway to Lindisfarne.

Remember that you cannot cross the causeway for some time either side of high tide. To check when you can cross, go to http://www.lindisfarne.org.uk/general/travel.htm

Tide times are subject to vast variations throughout each month and in particular during strong winds. Tide tables can only be advisory. Ensure that you observe the warning signs particularly along the road side. The tidal currents can be very strong. Should you become stranded use the refuge boxes provided.

By Foot

On foot, you can return along The Borders Abbeys Way to rejoin The St Cuthbert's Way.

Remember that you cannot cross the causeway for some time either side of high tide. To check when you can cross, go to http://www.lindisfarne.org.uk/general/travel.htm

Tide times are subject to vast variations throughout each month and in particular during strong winds. Tide tables can only be advisory. Ensure that you observe the warning signs particularly along the road side. The tidal currents can be very strong. Should you become stranded use the refuge boxes provided.

If looking for a short walk on this section of the route, park at Holburn Grange and walk to St Cuthbert's Cave, and on up the hill to look seawards.

By Public Transport

Berwick-on-Tweed can be reached, changing buses in St Boswells. From there taxis can be taken to Lindisfarne.

For information on public transport in the Nort East of England, see http://jplanner.travelinenortheast.info/

There is a bus service between Morpeth and Berwick which stops at 'Beal Holy Island rd end'. From here it is a 3.5 mile walk across the causeway to the priory.

Public transport information can be found on the Traveline website.

By Morebattle, Linton and Yetholm, we travel through Cuthbert’s country parish. Here he visited and nursed, shared the sacraments, taught and encouraged. One of the most touching of Cuthbert’s relics is the little portable altar, later ornamented with silver, which became the focus of loving community wherever he went. The ancient churches in these Cheviot villages are the legacy of his labour as a healer and shepherd of souls.

Just past Kirk Yetholm is the site of the Chapel St Ethelreda, the reluctant Queen whose flight took her to St Abb’s Head and finally to Ely where she founded the monastery which became the Cathedral of the Fens. This valley of the Glen was a powerhouse of British Christianity. At Kirknewton the medieval Church of St Gregory remembers the sending of St Augustine to Canterbury in 597, the year of Columba’s death on Iona. Just beyond the village at Gefrin, below the hill fortress of Yeavering Bell, St Paulinus, a forerumner of Pope Gregory’s mission, conducted mass baptisms in the river. A monument and walkway marks what was once an important royal centre. At Kirknewton the female tradition of Northumbrian Christianity continues with commemoration of Josephine Butler, whose campaigning work on behalf of prostitutes exposed the hypocrisies of a later supposedly Christian society.

But the predominant influence here today is still Cuthbert’s, as we continue by Wooler towards the coast. St Cuthbert’s Cave is a natural retreat, and, though the origins of the site are obscure, it has been adopted because it is so redolent of the authentic Cuthbert spirit. One of the defining moments of the journey is to climb the rise beyond the Cave to see the ocean, islands and shores rolled out beneath.

There is the Holy Island of Aidan and Cuthbert, with the rocky retreats of St Cuthbert’s Isle and the Inner Farne. The Prior’s journey was ever towards greater prayerful solitude, till as a reluctant Bishop he was drawn back into mission and pastoral care. Though his heartfelt wish to die on his Farne Hermitage was granted, Cuthbert’s body was brought back to Lindisfarne to become an object of pilgrimage and devotion.

We would love to hear about your experiences on this route - please post your comments below